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    California State University, Stanislaus
   
 
  Sep 21, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 Academic Catalog

Nursing M.S.


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Carolyn T. Martin, R.N., Ph.D., Graduate Assistant Director

Office:  Science 1 - 209E
Phone:  (209) 664-6591

View information for the School of Nursing .

The primary purpose of the Master of Science in Nursing is to develop skilled professionals able to assume positions of leadership, which contribute to the health, education, and social structure of the community, state, nation, and world.  The core curriculum provides students with knowledge essential to all nurses prepared at the master's level.  Graduates will be able to critique and evaluate research findings and to apply research findings in order to provide high quality care, initiate change, and implement evidence-based nursing practice.  Students will have an understanding of health care policy, health care organizations, and financing of health care which will prepare them to assume leadership positions in an ever-evolving health care system.  In addition, knowledge of ethical decision making principles and health disparity issues will help to assure that appropriate and sensitive health care is provided.

Students electing the concentration in Education will be prepared to assume roles in nursing education in either an academic or service setting.  The concentration in Gerontological Nursing will prepare nursing professionals to meet the growing demands of an aging population.  Furthermore, specialization in this area will provide graduates with essential content to function as managers, providers, and organizers of health care for geriatric patients/clients.  The concentration in Nursing Administration will prepare nurses for administrative roles such as Nurse Executive, Nurse Manager, Quality Improvement Manager, Ambulatory Care Manager, or other system level nursing positions in community agencies, health care facilities, health departments, and schools of nursing.

The Masters of Science with a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) concentration will prepare nurses to work as primary care providers to patients throughout the lifespan. With advanced clinical training, FNPs are authorized to diagnose illnesses, treat conditions, and provide evidence-based health education to their patients. FNPs are prepared to provide preventive acute chronic care services to individuals of all ages. FNPs deliver primary care in small and large, private and public practices and in clinics, schools, and workplaces. They work independently and collaboratively within the health care team.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, graduates will be able to:

  1. Employ critical thinking and clinical reasoning in providing evidence-based nursing care to diverse individuals, families, and communities;
  2. Contribute to the development and application of nursing knowledge through the use of theory and the scientific process;
  3. Participate in the organization, management, and leadership of clinical, education, or societal environments;
  4. Practice skilled oral, written, and electronic communication that demonstrate the ability to express ideas in a variety of situations;
  5. Provide culturally appropriate health care to a diverse community; and,
  6. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to continue their education through doctoral study.

 In addition to the core student learning outcomes, students completing the concentration in education will be able to:

  1. Critique, evaluate, and utilize concepts and theories of nursing, educational pedagogy, and curricula in the development of nursing education programs;
  2. Apply principles of measurement and evaluation in the development and implementation of strategies for assessing student learning; and,
  3. Utilize evidence-based teaching strategies to facilitate learning in settings where nurses function as educators for nurses, students, patients, families, and communities.

In addition to the core student learning outcomes, students completing the concentration in gerontological nursing will be able to:

  1. Critique, evaluate, and utilize concepts and theories of aging to design and implement effective intervention strategies to enhance independence and autonomy of older persons;
  2. Utilize an understanding of the nature and scope of social, economic, physical, education, and behavioral issues of aging in the development and implementation of programs for older persons; and,
  3. Work effectively within an interdisciplinary setting and with diverse professionals, patients, families, and communities.

In addition to the core student learning outcomes, students completing the concentration in nursing administration will be able to:

  1. Adapt business and nursing theory to develop financial, ethical, and medically sound healthcare solutions.
  2. Evaluate, plan, and lead effectively in various interprofessional settings and healthcare environments.
  3. Contribute to private and public health policy as a leader of health organizations and agencies.
  4. Utilize general business concepts to analyze and resolve managerial problems.

In addition to the core student learning outcomes, students completing the concentration in family nurse practitioner (FNP) will be able to:

  1. Synthesize theoretical, scientific, and contemporary clinical knowledge for the assessment and management of both health and illness states for the purposes of health promotion, health protections, disease prevention, and treatment of individuals, the family, aggregate groups, and the community.
  2. Demonstrate a personal, collegial, and collaborative approach that enhances effectiveness in patient care.
  3. Function as a licensed independent practitioner using evidence to continuously improve quality of clinical practice.
  4. Demonstrate commitment to the implementation, preservation, and evolution of the FNP role.
  5. Implement clinical reasoning and build collaborative, interdisciplinary relationships to provide optimal health care to the patient.
  6. Oversee and direct the delivery of clinical services within an integrated system of health to achieve improved health care outcomes for patients, communities, and systems.
  7. Ensure quality of health care through consultation, collaboration, continuing education, certification, and evaluation (eligible for state and national certifications upon completion of the program).
  8. Provide culturally competent care deliver patient care with respect to cultural and spiritual beliefs, and make health care resources available to patients from diverse cultures.

Requirements for Admission to the Graduate Program in the School of Nursing

  1. Admission to the Stanislaus State Graduate School;
  2. Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution.  If the Bachelor's degree is in a discipline other than nursing, an Associate Degree in Nursing is also required;
  3. Minimum of a 3.0 cumulative grade point average (on a 4.0 scale);
  4. Current license to practice as a registered nurse in the state of California;
  5. Successful completion (minimum grade of C) of an undergraduate statistics course;
  6. Two professional references; and,
  7. Résumé with cover letter indicating professional goals.
  8. International Students: Proficiency in spoken and written English with the following minimum TOEFL scores: 550 for the paper-based examination, 80 on Internet-based examination.

Note: After acceptance into the nursing program and prior to beginning any courses students must meet all School of Nursing health requirements. 

The School of Nursing Admissions Committee takes into consideration each of the requirements related to rendering an admission decision.  Applicants who do not meet all of the requirements but whose credentials reveal potential ability for master's study are reviewed on an individual basis.  Applicants may be required to fulfill specific prerequisites or other conditions of admission prior to an admission decision or may be admitted on a provisional basis.  Provisional admission status requires the student to meet specific requirements before full admission status is granted.  FNP concentration students will not be admitted on a provisional basis. Students with an Associate Degree in Nursing and a Bachelor's degree in a non-nursing discipline will be admitted on a provisional basis and must complete 12 units of bridge courses prior to being fully admitted to the Master's program.  FNP concentration students must complete the BRIDGE coursework prior to taking FNP coursework. Master's level courses are normally restricted to students admitted to the graduate program. With approval of the nursing graduate coordinator, graduate core course work may be pursued prior to admission if the student has provisional admission status.  Enrollment in graduate course work does not guarantee admission to the nursing program.

Requirements:


(36-48 units)

The Master of Science degree requires completion of 36 units distributed as follows:

  1. Nineteen units of core courses in the MSN program for students enrolled in the Education, Administration and Gerontological Nursing concentrations and twenty-three units of core courses for students enrolled in the FNP concentration;

  2. Fourteen units of graduate coursework in the Education, Administration and Gerontological Nursing concentrations including 3 to 6 units of elective course work at the undergraduate 4000 level or graduate level and 22 units of graduate coursework in the FNP concentration;

  3. Students in Education, Administration, and Gerontological Nursing concentrations may choose between Thesis, Project, or Comprehensive Examination.  This choice should be made early in the program.  Students should consult with the graduate adviser for current policies.  Students choosing the Thesis, Project, or Comprehensive Examination will enroll in 3 units of culminating experience. All concentrations take NURS 5970 - Culminating Experience Preparation . FNP students choose the Comprehensive Examination option only.

Requirements for Continuation in the Program

Students in the graduate nursing program must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in courses taken to satisfy the requirements of the degree. No grade lower than a "B-" will be accepted in courses taken to satisfy degree requirements. Students who fail to maintain a GPA of 3.0 will be placed on academic probation and will be notified of the conditions required for removal of the probation.

Students with an Associate Degree in Nursing and a non-nursing bachelor's degree will also be required to complete the following bridge courses in order to continue to progress through the graduate program.  In addition, students must pass the WPST prior to being admitted to the graduate program.

*Availability of the bridging courses would correspond with the current RN-BSN roadmap.
*FNP concentration students must complete the BRIDGE coursework prior to taking FNP coursework.

Core Courses for Students in all concentrations:


(22-26 units)

Take the following core courses for students in all concentrations:

Take 3 units of Culminating Experience coursework:


A culminating experience is required for completion of the graduate program in nursing.  Students may choose from one of three options:  1) thesis, 2) project, or 3) comprehensive examination.

Concentrations:


(14-22 units)

Electives:


Complete 3 units of upper division 4000 level or graduate level Education concentration electives. Electives are determined in collaboration with the graduate advisor.

Electives:


Complete 5 units of upper division 4000 level or graduate level Gerontological Nursing concentration electives. Electives are determined in collaboration with the graduate advisor.

A Note on Culminating Experience


A culminating experience is required for completion of the graduate program in nursing.

The thesis is the written product of a systematic investigation of a significant problem in nursing.  The thesis clearly identifies the problem, states major assumptions, explains the significance to nursing, proposes the sources for and methods of gathering information, collects and analyzes data, and offers a conclusion or recommendation.  The thesis topic is developed, approved, and evaluated by the student's graduate committee.  The finished product must demonstrate evidence of originality, critical and independent thinking, appropriate organization and format, and thorough documentation.  The formal paper will demonstrate potential for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.

The project is a comprehensive and significant undertaking appropriate to the practice of nursing.  Completion of a project will provide the student with a body of evidence-based knowledge on a specific clinical question of significance to nursing.  The project is developed, approved, and evaluated by the student's graduate committee.  An example of an appropriate project:

Developing a Practice Improvement Project (PIP).  The student will design and implement a population-based practice improvement project addressing identified practice-related problems or questions.  This option strongly emphasizes collaboration between nurses and community agencies and includes working with an agency using practice data to provide answers, which are responsive to the needs of clinicians, administrators, and policy makers for improvement of programs or practices.  This project can take the form of either assessment or outcome evaluation.

The finished product is expected to demonstrate originality, critical and independent thinking, and appropriate organization and format.  The formal paper will demonstrate potential for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.

The comprehensive examination is a written document that requires students to demonstrate mastery of coursework in their area of clinical expertise.  Emphasis is placed on demonstration of the relevance of coursework for practice.  Questions for the comprehensive examination are developed, approved, and evaluated by the student's graduate committee.  The student prepares a written response to the examination questions.  The comprehensive examination evaluates the graduate student's ability to analyze and synthesize clinical and theoretical knowledge gained in their course of study.  An example of an appropriate comprehensive examination:

Conducting and writing a systematic review of the literature.  A systematic review of the literature should include:  the problem statement and research questions, search strategy, sampling plan for identification of relevant studies including inclusion and exclusion criteria, systematic means of reviewing and evaluating the studies, data analysis, and conclusions based on the quality, quantity, and consistency of evidence.

The finished product is expected to demonstrate originality, critical and independent thinking, and appropriate organization and format.  The formal paper will demonstrate potential for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.

Students completing a culminating experience option must participate in an oral presentation to complete the program.

Note: Once a student enrolls in the culminating experience, they must maintain continuous enrollment through registration in either NURS 7005 Continuing Thesis or Project, or NURS 7006 Continuing Comprehensive Examination.

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